Iran Presidential Election: Reformism prevailed over fundamentalism, how a big reversal happened in Iran

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According to Iran’s election authority, Pezeshkian received over 17 million votes, while Jalili received over 13 million votes in the election. Around 30 million votes were cast in the entire election.

Iran held presidential elections after President Ibrahim Raisi was killed in a helicopter crash last month. Heart surgeon Masoud Pazeshkian has won the contest between hardline nuclear negotiator Saeed Jalili and reformist Masoud Pazeshkian. Pazeshkian has also been the country’s former health minister. He won by promising to engage with the West and ease enforcement of the country’s mandatory headscarf law after a period of sanctions and protests in the Islamic Republic. Pazeshkian’s opponent hardline Saeed Jalili lost the election contest. According to Iran’s election authority, Pazeshkian received more than 17 million votes, while Jalili received more than 13 million votes in the election. About 30 million votes were cast in the entire election.

Earlier, in the initial round of voting on June 28, no candidate got more than 50 percent votes, due to which re-polls are being held. Voters have to choose between radical former nuclear negotiator Saeed Jalili and heart surgeon and long-time parliament member Masood Pazshkian. In the voting held on June 28, moderate leader Masood Pazshkian has secured 10.4 million i.e. 42 percent votes. On the other hand, radical leader Saeed Jalili got only 9.4 million i.e. 38.6 percent votes.

According to Iranian media Iran Wire, people see Pezeshkian as a reformist. He is considered close to former President Hassan Rouhani. He is also an advocate of building better relations with Western countries. Throughout his campaign, Pezeshkian refrained from promising any major changes to Iran’s Shia theocracy. He has consistently recognized Supreme Leader Ayatollah Ali Khamenei as the final authority in all matters related to the state. However, Pezeshkian’s modest objectives may face challenges from the Iranian government, which remains largely controlled by hardliners.

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